Look who’s talking toot

This story is a response to the photo prompt below at https://flashfictionforaspiringwriters.wordpress.com/.  The photo is courtesy of http://pixabay.com/.  Thank you to Priceless Joy for catering for our aspirations.

The story is 148 words.

Car and bike

‘Say, Barnaby, why do people do that thing with us, treat us like we’re human?’
‘Anthropomorphism?’
‘Yeah, with the names and stuff. Calling me Daisy, like I’m a girl, just ‘cos I’m … piccolo.’
‘You’re Italian?’
‘Italian-American. I have family in Poughkeepsie.’
‘Now you’re doing it.’
‘The anthro thing? Anyways, if I was human –’
Were human.’
‘What I’m saying is, I’d be like Joe Pesci, small but tough.’
‘Capisco.’
‘But they dress me up like a little princess.’
I could call you something that suits either gender.’
‘They have bisexual names?’
’I was thinking unisex, like Frankie.’
‘I like it.’
‘In return, would you stop calling me Barnaby?’
‘But it’s your given name, right? Cos you’re a Rudge bicycle.’
‘Yes, but – ’
‘Don’t sound so surprised. I’ve read some Dickens.’
‘Unlike my owner. Barnaby Rudge was a simpleton.’
‘Okay, so what should I call you?’
‘Elvis?’

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13 Responses to Look who’s talking toot

  1. This is really cute! I think Elvis is a fitting name. 🙂 Too bad the car is being treated as though he is a woman. Great story! Thank you for participating in the Flash Fiction for Aspiring Writers Challenge!

    Like

    • JS Brand says:

      Thank you for giving me the chance to join in. The wrong gender thing seems to work both ways when people name their cars – I think a lot of us routinely associate size and strength with masculinity. As a teenager I had a customer on a newspaper round who called his Volvo Amazon* “Hercules”. I knew Hippolyta would have been more appropriate but, as he was Greek god-sized himself, I never pointed out his error (which was a particularly cruel one, given what happened between these two mythical characters).
      Daisy/Frankie seems to have the automotive equivalent of small man syndrome.

      * – apparently this model was called the 122S in the US, owing to a trademark dispute. Shame.

      Liked by 1 person

      • I really have never thought about gender in referring to cars but then, I never named any of my cars. LOL! That is a funny story about the name of the car. I hope you feel welcome in the Flash Fiction for Aspiring Writers Challenge. I look forward to reading future stories!

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  2. JS Brand says:

    I feel very welcome thank you and look forward to coming back.

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  3. Loved reading this very much.

    Like

  4. justmaria says:

    Boys and wheels! I really can’t understand them. But this one is such an enjoyable read. I like their conversation. I hope my things won’t be mad at me for calling them names, too. 😀

    Like

    • JS Brand says:

      Now I’m wishing I’d made Daisy a tomboy, just as annoyed at being covered in Flowers as her male counterpart. By the way, you’re doing the anthro thing too – your things can’t hear you (as long as you whisper, like I do).

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Funny. I think it is only right that inanimate objects should be allowed to choose their own names. 🙂

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  6. JS Brand says:

    I agree, as long as they’re not put in a more favourable position than humans, by being able to choose their names from day one. How many kids are saddled with the strangest names by parents who fail to look ahead? True, they have the option to change later on, but it’s not easy and by then the psychological damage might have been done. Yes, I’m speaking from experience – my middle name caused me a lot of embarrassment until I learned to wear it as a badge of pride. (I’m not a boy named Sue, by the way)

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  7. Deb says:

    Loved it! Very engaging, I was drawn into the conversation and really felt like the bike and the car were talking with each other…how clever!

    Like

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